Features from August 2018

Columns - August 2018

  • Bow prep now is time well spent
    It’s time to prepare for the upcoming bowhunting season, and what you do now could very well determine outcomes later this fall.
  • Cajun Cooking is a family affair
    “Tonight we do Cajun,” proclaimed the rugged man’s man with a flourish. “I’m a Coonass — but I’m really half-Italian and half-Cajun. My Momma was a Baldissaro.”
  • GPS waypoints: Delacroix to Point A La Hache
    This area is actually where Capt. Paul’s Fishing Edge got started. The interest generated from this location allowed me to start marketing waypoints for 21 different areas, including Barataria Bay, Lake Borgne, Hopedale to Bayou Terre Boeufs, Bayou Bienvenue, Port Sulphur, Lake Pontchartrain, Lake Borgne and many more.
  • How to age white-tailed deer: Part IV
    Learn how to age the bucks that most hunters mount, the 4- to 6-year-old deer that are exhibiting their best antler growth.
  • It’s a big year
    Several years ago, I went to see the movie “The Big Year” starring Steve Martin, Jack Black and Owen Wilson. While it was enjoyable, I also found it somewhat educational.
  • Mister Twister’s Nightcrawler
    Glen Freeman of Zwolle has a new weapon in his bass fishing arsenal when he goes out to Toledo Bend. So does Zack Hughes of Quitman, Texas, who boated a 10-plus-pounder on the first day he fished with it at Lake Fork.
  • Plastics for panfish
    Many kayak anglers dream of catching giant fish from their small plastic boats. However, going in the completely opposite direction can be even more fun. Imagine catching scores of tiny, delicious fish — using nothing more than worms and a cane pole, or lightweight spinning gear.
  • So what’s a sunperch?
    Louisiana’s bream fishermen have a pile of fish to choose from. Tops on the list are bluegills and redear sunfish (also called lake runners or chinquapin). And fat-bellied goggle-eyes are always in the mix somewhere. In a lot of places, you can throw in some green sunfish (slick perch) or red-spotted sunfish (stumpknockers). 
  • Summertime prep for fall hunting
    A line from a Mark Chesnutt song goes: “It’s too hot to fish, and too hot for golf and too cold at home.” I have an amen for his estimation of the current fishing and golf conditions, and am happy to report good weather at home.
  • Time is short
    My goodness, where has the time gone? In another month, SEC football games will be playing live on television, and the opening of archery season for deer will be less than 30 days away.

Outdoor Updates - August 2018

Field Notes - August 2018

  • Apex Predator goes ‘sight-crabbing’ for monster blues
    I vaguely saw a quick fleck of blue in the moss 2 feet below the surface of the clear marsh water. Unsure of what actually was beneath the ripples, I tossed my jighead hooked with catfish skin next to the grass pile. It laid on the mud bottom for two seconds, when a huge claw suddenly flashed out of the green growth.
  • Get real-time tidal conditions — right on the water
    Windy conditions are pretty much a way of life, especially along the Louisiana coast — and those breezes can have a big impact on tidal flow and the timing of high and low tides.
  • Inshore insights: Keep your tackle tangle-free
    How annoying is it when you grab one rod and two others are attached to it? 
  • Inshore Insights: Mystery baitfish revealed
    We were fishing Delacroix when a speckled trout coughed up this weird thing shown in the picture above. Read on to learn what exactly it is — and why it’s important to you as an inshore angler.
  • Tracking trout movement at the MRGO
    Back in May, me and some of my closest fishing buddies targeted speckled trout to be tagged and released at the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) Long Rocks. 

Hot Spots - August 2018

  • Beat the heat for August specks
    Fishing is all about stacking as many odds in your favor as possible, and something you should certainly put in your favor this month is leaving the dock early. Not only do you beat the heat, but you also get a much better speckled trout bite, according to Slidell guide Capt. Matt McCabe.
  • Big Lake beach fishing
    With speckled trout fishing success up and down this year in Calcasieu Lake, particularly during a summer plagued by high west winds, it’s time to point the bow of the boat to the beach from Johnson Bayou to Holly Beach.
  • Cool off with ‘bass on the rocks’
    The hot summer weather got you down? Well, why not cool off with some bass on the rocks — Red River south style.
  • Delacroix’s redfish summer
    Previously, on a typical August day, Delacroix anglers would head out into Black Bay and fish the same islands and structures that have produced trout for decades. Stone Island, Lonesome Island, Belle Island, the Wreck, the Black Tanks, Iron Banks and Battledore Reef were landmarks thick with trout and consistent producers, year after year.
  • How to find bass in the Atchafalaya Basin
    Unless the lower Spillway turned on in late July, at least one Morgan City bass angler will be fishing on the other side of the East Atchafalaya Basin Protection Levee in August.
  • Minimal tackle key for Grand Isle beach bite
    No matter what kind of fishing you’re doing in the marsh, finding clean water is almost always helpful.
  • Nighttime is the right time at Toledo Bend
    Getting bites during the heat of the day in August could be a challenge for bass anglers at Toledo Bend.
  • Run with the bulls in Venice
    Inshore action out of Venice has been consistent this summer, and may be one of the best parts of the state if you’re looking to battle bull redfish.
  • Slow but steady
    August can be a slow month for speckled trout fishing, but in the Dularge area this month, local guide Capt. Marty LaCoste expects it to be really good.
  • Stay on the move to find Hopedale trout
    Hot. Sizzling, searing, scorching, broiling, roasting — all describe our summer weather, and the trout don’t seem to like it any more than we do. Perhaps it’s why they pulled a disappearing act in June and have had anglers scratching their heads ever since.