Redfishology

When you have a bull red like this in your hands, you know you’ve passed the Redfishology course.
When you have a bull red like this in your hands, you know you’ve passed the Redfishology course.

Studying these directions can help you pass the test

Classes are now in session for Redfishology, with a special major in the art of kayak fishing under the direction of Professor Phillip Logan of Gretna. Class is now being held at several “campuses” along the edge of the Gulf of Mexico out of Plaquemines Parish. Classes are available all year long.

Winter reds

In layman’s terms — it’s time to catch giant redfish in a kayak with Logan, owner and operator of Explore Kayak Adventure Company, leading the way. The redfish bite is on. Sneaking up on them in a kayak is a unique opportunity that not only helps you land a limit of these trophy fighters, but learn so much about them as well. And the area around Plaquemines is unparalleled, Logan said.

This whopper redfish caught by Phillip Logan was landed by sneaking up on the fish in a kayak.
This whopper redfish caught by Phillip Logan was landed by sneaking up on the fish in a kayak.

“I know I’m biased, but I’ve fished all over the Gulf South for reds and the area from Plaquemines on the West Bank to Port Sulphur and Venice is the best year-round for redfishing,” he said. “There are tons of great areas. This year low water has been a problem in some areas and the wind has had a bad effect on some of the flats, even for kayak anglers. But you just have to follow the fish. Right now after it’s like playing ping-pong with the fish after cold fronts. The fish will move back and forth from the shallows into the deeper spots at the ends of canals and bordering flats.

“We can still catch them shallow even when it’s cold, but the fish hang more on the outskirts of the flats and other shallow water. We don’t always go as early this time of year when it’s cold because when it’s sunny, it will warm up those shallower areas where the reds like to feed. It doesn’t have to warm up a lot to get them more aggressive.”

Sight fishing from a kayak

Logan said it’s a great time for sight fishing.

“I love fishing the Bugg’s fishing lures in the blue crab pattern.” he said. “It’s a flat head jig and is made with rabbit hair. It stands up in the water just like a crab.

“I also like the 2.75 or 3 inch Capt. Lane’s Mad Mullet in Chicken on a Chain color, a green top and white bottom. When we see a fish, we cast out past it and try to retrieve it slowly in front of their line of sight. If they aren’t aggressive, sometimes we just stop it and give it a twitch. These are lures that also land light in the water and help to not spook the fish.”

Logan has a unique setup that allows him and clients to get way out away from shore in kayaks without paddling for 30 or 40 miles. His secret weapon is a “motherboat” that has a rack holding up to six kayaks. He often makes overnight trips where he is dropped off right on barrier islands and unloads kayaks, camping gear and cooking equipment for an overnight stay when the fishing is right in those areas.

This “mothership” carries up to six kayakers on an overnight redfish trip.
This “mothership” carries up to six kayakers on an overnight redfish trip.

“I tell you, we aren’t but an hour ride by car and a 30-minute ride by boat, but when you come make that overnight trip, it’s like you are far off on some island far away from anybody or anything,” he said.

You can keep up with Logan, or get in contact with him about a conventional or fly tackle trip, on Facebook at Explore Kayak Adventure Company, on Instagram @explore_kayak_adco or by calling 504-376-6620.

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Kinny Haddox
About Kinny Haddox 374 Articles
Kinny Haddox has been writing magazine and newspaper articles about the outdoors in Louisiana for 45 years. He publishes a daily website, lakedarbonnelife.com and is a member of the Louisiana Chapter of the Outdoor Legends Hall of Fame. He and his wife, DiAnne, live in West Monroe.

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