Fish the tree you can’t see

Darren Chambers with the 18-inch, 2.6-pound sac-a-lait he caught using live bait in the Lake Verret area.
Darren Chambers with the 18-inch, 2.6-pound sac-a-lait he caught using live bait in the Lake Verret area.

When fishermen approach a cypress tree, they see the trunk, limbs and maybe the top of the root system. When crappie swim up beside a cypress tree, they see it in a whole different light.

Good crappie fishermen see an entire cypress tree and where fish might hide — like the root ball — even if much of it is normally underwater.
Good crappie fishermen see an entire cypress tree and where fish might hide — like the root ball — even if much of it is normally underwater.

A normal cypress tree has a huge ball of roots under the water that stick out a foot to 18 inches from the trunk. Under that big ball is more tree trunk. When the water level is normal, this area below the roots is a prime spot for crappie to spawn.

To catch those crappie you’ve got to get your lure as close as you can to that area for them. If you just swim a lure past the root ball, you may not even have it where the fish are. That’s why “tree hugging” is an important technique to have for spring crappie.

About Kinny Haddox 529 Articles
Kinny Haddox has been writing magazine and newspaper articles about the outdoors in Louisiana for 45 years. He publishes a daily website, lakedarbonnelife.com and is a member of the Louisiana Chapter of the Outdoor Legends Hall of Fame. He and his wife, DiAnne, live in West Monroe.

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