If the notion of “shooting fish in a barrel” appeals to you, summer trout fishing probably won’t be your cup of tea. Sure, you may find a pile of fish, but finding implies looking — and this time of year often requires a lot of that.

“The one thing that separates the guys who constantly catch more trout than others is the willingness to run-and-gun ‘til you figure out a pattern or area where the fish are biting,” said Capt. Troy Robichaux. “The number one mistake most anglers make is sitting in one spot hoping the fish will start biting or come to them. We believe in going to the fish. 

“There are some days when you have to understand that it’s a slow bite, and you have to stick and stay and make them play. This comes from years on the water, determining if it’s a slow bite or if it’s a bite that’s just going to stop and start, and it’s time to move to an area with better tide or more bait or better water.”

Capt. Anthony Randazzo agreed, and amplified that point with this parting note: “The number one key to summer success while trout fishing is to start very early, You want to watch the sunrise from the boat, and hopefully be casting at the safest early light you can coordinate.”