The federal red snapper season closes Friday (June 28), but that doesn't mean snapper fishing ends off the Louisiana coast — it simply means the state's weekends-only recreational snapper season resumes, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced.

The weekends-only state fishing season will kick in again Saturday (June 29) and continue through September, the LDWF said.

The bag and possession limit during the state season also increases to three fish per person, although the minimum total length remains at 16 inches, the LDWF said.

LDWF defines state waters as extending 10.357 miles from the coast, although the waters between the traditional three-mile boundary and the 10.357-mile mark are contested. Federal officials have said they do not acknowledge state authority past the three-mile mark.

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For the purposes of the state season, a weekend is defined as Friday through Sunday, with the exception of Labor Day, when Monday will be considered part of the weekend, the agency said.

Because of the dispute over offshore fisheries management authority, LDWF officials encouraged anglers to "use caution and their own personal judgment when fishing beyond the three mile boundary that is currently recognized as federal waters, as it is fully expected that federal agents will continue to enforce federal law. Until the time when the US Congress confirms Louisiana's action, the battle will continue over Louisiana's state water boundary."

LDWF said anglers are required to acquire a free offshore landing permit that is for all anglers, including those not normally required to possess a recreational fishing license, possessing tunas, billfish, swordfish, amberjacks, groupers and snappers (except gray snapper), and hinds.

Data collected through the permit program will help strengthen the case for state management of red snapper, the LDWF said. Click here to read how state data already has changed federal season structures.

Click here to obtain the Recreational Offshore Landing Permit.