Pousson readily admitted that the Mermentau is home to river bass, and a keeper fish here averages 1 ½ to 2 pounds.

His largest bass taken in the river was just shy of 5 pounds, nad he’s seen 5-pound bass taken on occasion.

For tournaments, a winning sack of five bass from the Mermentau will range from 11 to 14 pounds. His personal best bag tipped the scales at 14 pounds.

According to biologist manager Sean Kinney with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries in Lake Charles, the Mermentau River has been stocked with Florida bass fry the last couple of years.

“For the most part right now, anglers will catch the typical river bass — most under 5 pounds,” Kinney said. “We have recently found that bass quality has improved in the lower Mermentau Estuary in Grand Lake and Lake Misere. 

“We are now engaging in an investigation to look at the genetics in samples of bass in these locations. We do have Florida fingerling stock ponds at Rockefeller Refuge, and the Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge is in proximity to the area.

“It could be that the lower Mermentau system has been affected by some of these fingerlings at Rockefeller, and the Florida bass at Lacassine,” he said. “It will be a while until we have the results of these samples.”

As lagniappe, the Mermentau River is also home to a good black and white crappie (sac-a-lait) population.

“There are many sac-a-lait anglers here who fish laydowns with shiners and jigs, both south and north of the landing under the bridge,” Pousson said. “I sometimes see some respectable white perch taken here.”