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Randy Pausina, former head of LDWF's Office of Fisheries, approved hundreds of thousands of dollars in expenditures now being questioned by state auditors.

Audit shows millions misspent by LDWF after BP oil spill

Louisiana’s legislative auditor found a lack of management oversight of funds and operations in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries in the wake of the BP oil spill, including sampling operations in Venice that cost $2,796 per fish, more than $280,000 in clothing and uniforms with no uniform purchasing policy in place and a used $1.8 million airplane that could now cost the state more than $500,000 to repair.

November 14 at 5:36pm
The November 2016 aerial waterfowl survey conducted by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries counted more than 3 million birds in the state last week, 50 percent higher than the long-term average of 2 million birds.

3 million-plus ducks noted in November aerial survey

Despite no really cold weather so far, the annual November aerial waterfowl survey completed last week indicated almost 3 million ducks have already arrived along Louisiana’s coast.

November 14 at 5:24pm
Capt. Brian Sherman with Kayak Venice shows off a nice red caught up against the canes on the eastern edge of Yellow Cotton Bay. November is a great month to target reds and specks within easy paddling distance in Venice, he said.

Kayak Venice: Tips for November specks and redfish

If you’re planning on doing some kayak-fishing along the Louisiana coast this month, Venice is a great destination with relatively short paddles — putting redfish and speckled trout within easy reach of most anglers.

November 10 at 3:24pm
Mud boats and air-cooled propulsion engines are prohibited after 2 p.m. on Pass-a-Loutre Wildlife Management Area now through Jan. 31, 2017, according to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

New regs on mud boats, air-cooled engines now in effect at Pass-a-Loutre WMA

New regulations for mud boats and air-cooled propulsion engines are in effect now through Jan. 31, 2017 at Pass-a-Loutre Wildlife Management Area, and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries wants to make sure duck hunters are aware of the changes.

November 04 at 9:45am
Bull reds like this one will crush a topwater popper that looks like a fleeing mullet.

Mullet mayhem— Target mullet schools to catch more bull redfish

Everyone loves a parade, especially when it doubles as the buffet line. And that’s the deal with the major mullet movement that happens each fall-winter — it’s an all-out whack fest that’s as close to guaranteed fishing action as you’ll find.

Reproduction is the primary motivation and prespawn aggregations can be significant. The best part is that this parade’s duration — which roughly runs from October through March — offers multiple opportunities for redfish.

November 01 at 7:00am
Sportsman TV host Greg Hackney punched through lilies bordering the cane in Venice for all of the bass he caught Wednesday. With the Mississippi River still dirty, Hack suggested waiting to fish the last few hours of a falling tide.

Hackney punches his way to Venice bass bite

With an incoming tide and dirtier-than-expected water to start the day Wednesday, it took a while for the bass bite to turn on down in Venice.

September 29 at 7:50am
Venice redfish are always willing to eat, but you can get a lot more bites if the Mississippi River is low and green. And there's a trick to figuring out when that will happen.

Northern Mississippi River gauges key to Venice fishing, Hackney says

Fall is here. Temperatures have finally started to moderate, and some of the year’s best fishing will be available without getting heat stroke.

And Bassmaster Elite Series pro and Sportsman TV host Greg Hackney said he launches his boat at Venice as often as possible. 

“You’re getting in that time of year when the (Mississippi) river gets green,” Hackney said in a live Facebook feed from Venice Marina early this morning. “The trout start showing up in the Jump (and) they show up on the jetties in the main river.

“You can catch bass, white bass, redfish and trout — all on the same stuff.”

Of course, prime fishing is all about water clarity, and that’s dictated by the rise and fall of the river. A low river (generally below 4 feet at the New Orleans gauge) means water should be green and clear, while a higher reading hints at muddy conditions.

September 28 at 9:49am
Sportsman TV host Greg Hackney will be doing live feeds from Venice all day Wednesday on Louisiana Sportsman's Facebook page. Tune in to see what kind of day he has chasing bass in the Delta National Wildlife Refuge.

Hackney live from Venice on Facebook Wednesday morning

If you want to see what goes on behind the scenes while filming an episode of Sportsman TV, check out Louisiana Sportsman’s Facebook page all day Wednesday for live reports from Greg Hackney — who’s down in Venice to target bass at the Delta National Wildlife Refuge.

September 27 at 7:17pm
Overall, hunters reported a relatively slow teal season across South Louisiana this year, possibly because of no real cool fronts, last month's historic floods creating more water on the landscape and fewer birds making it into the state.

Slow teal season comes to an end

Not surprisingly, hunters and guides across South Louisiana reported relatively slow action for most of the 16-day 2016 teal season, which came to a merciful end Sunday on yet another 90 degrees-plus day.

September 26 at 12:27pm
According to a preliminary audit covering 2010 to 2015, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries misspent money received after the BP oil spill on questionable purchases, with little oversight by department management.

Legislative Auditor: LDWF misspent BP oil spill money

A preliminary draft of the state auditor’s report — which hasn’t been made public yet — reveals some Gulf oil spill money intended to ensure Louisiana-caught fish were safe for consumption after the BP disaster instead purchased unnecessary boats, iPads, cameras and fishing gear.

September 22 at 8:32am
Capt. Brian Sherman, with Kayak Venice, shows off a redfish caught along the roseau canes on the east side of Yellow Cotton Bay. Positioning your lure as close as possible to the canes is key to catching quality reds, Sherman said.

Kayaking in Venice: Redfish plentiful in Yellow Cotton Bay

Some kayak anglers might be hesitant to toss a popping cork — attached to a twirling 2-foot leader with a Vudu shrimp dangling from the business end — straight at stands of leaning, swaying, hook-grabbing roseau cane, but not Capt. Brian Sherman.

September 21 at 11:03am
Pop-up blinds work well in flooded marsh.

Finding secret teal-hunting treasures

Flooded wild millet growing naturally in the marsh can be a teal magnet when you can find it.

September 15 at 7:00am
Yellowfin tuna will be moving closer to the mouth of the Mississippi as river levels drop in the fall, allowing guides like Capt. Joey Davis to put their customers on fish with shorter trips out of Venice.

Falling Mississippi brings tuna bite nearer to mouth of river

September is well known as a transition month for speckled trout, when they begin the process of moving from offshore waters and heading back to inland marshes and bays for the winter.

September 07 at 8:00pm
Although many of the early fish of the day came on orange-bladed spinner baits, the bite later shifted to spinners with chartreuse and gold blades.

A humdinger! Spinnerbait tips for more Venice bass

When I was a kid, a big lie was called a “humdinger,” as in “That Billy Bob shore tole a humdinger!” 

Nowadays, the dictionary definition seems to have settled on a humdinger being something extraordinary or outstanding.

I’m sure this definition is the one Tony Landry prefers. 

September 01 at 7:00am