In fishing, many factors can determine your success, but in a transition month like March, temperature can be among the most critical elements.

That’s certainly true in the Dularge area, according to Capt. Marty LaCoste with Absolute Fishing Charters. 

“Everything is dependent on the water temperature,” he said. “Usually, if you have a warm winter, the trout are starting to show up in the lakes in February. In a cold winter, it’s March.”

With the severity of this winter, LaCoste believes it won’t be until this month when the trout make their presence known in the lakes.

“This March we’re thinking the trout are going to show up in the lakes and in the bayous that funnel into the lakes,” he said. 

Every spring, the lakes around Dularge hold speckled trout, and with good reason, the guide side.

“All the areas in the marsh where the fish are in the wintertime, all funnel into these lakes, and then the lakes lead out to the Gulf,” he said.

LaCoste prefers Sister Lake and Lake Mechant, but looking for baitfish in those areas is critical. 

“A lot of times, we’re looking for mullet,” he said. “Usually, that time of year over the reefs, the trout will be where the mullet are.”

LaCoste likes throwing a Matrix Shad threaded on ¼-ounce jigheads. He’ll throw both a single rig and a double rig.

“Most of the time, its tightlined, but the shrimp do start showing up that time of year, so if we get on a good bird bite, we’ll throw a double rig,” he said. “Every now and then, they will want it under a cork.”

When looking for trout under birds, it’s particularly important for the surface to be calm so the seagulls can spot the shrimp, and LaCoste said the wind is certainly not your friend.

“You always want it to be as calm as possible,” he said. “High winds are never good for trout fishing. It causes waves, the waves dirty up the water, and the trout need clearer water because they feed by sight.”