Here’s what you need to know statistically about the 180-inch (green, gross) buck Zac Carothers shot with a bow Sunday in Coahoma County in northwestern Mississippi.

It is a natural 14-point, practically symmetrical from the base to the ends of its twin, 26-inch main beams. What it lacks in tine length — the longest is 8 inches — it makes up for in mass.

Not only in the circumferences that hold above 5 inches through all but one allowable measurement, but also in measurable boney material. 

At the widest point, the two beams were 21 inches apart.

Now, let’s get down to the interesting and intriguing parts of this story. Zac Carothers was hunting with his best friend, favorite hunting partner and his mentor, Sean Carothers.

His dad.

“He’s always been my hunting partner, and I killed my first deer with him when I was 6 with a rifle,” the son said. “He played a big role in this buck because he passed on it last year when it was a 150- or 160-inch 12 point. It was right under his stand for 10 minutes.

“Dad knows deer and he knew it was young and would get bigger if it survived. It was a big buck but Dad knew had potential to be a lot bigger if he let it walk.”

The buck survived even though all the members of the Coahoma County club knew it was there. Going into this season the Carothers knew the competition for the big buck would be tough.

For the rest of the story from our friends at Mississippi Sportsman, click here