A 54-year-old Denham Springs man accused of running an illegal alligator hunting guide service on Joyce Wildlife Management Area in Tangipahoa Parish was arrested this weekend, according to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. 

David Caveretta was cited for not abiding by alligator hunting rules and regulations, not abiding by WMA regulations, taking alligators from unapproved areas, possession of illegally taken gators, improperly tagging gators, criminal trespassing and obstruction of justice, according to a news release.

An investigation revealed that Caveretta was allegedly running an illegal hunting guide service on Joyce WMA, including putting out alligator lines and capturing gators on private lands in Tangipahoa Parish without landowners’ permission. Caveretta also did not have the proper LDWF licenses to capture gators in those areas, the release states.

During questioning, the release states Caveretta attempted to mislead agents about the illegal hunting activities. Two alligators were seized in connection with the case.

In 2013, Caveretta also was cited for multiple gator violations for allegedly using nuisance tags on gators that were not nuisances.

According to LDWF spokesman Adam Einck, Caveretta was sentenced in Livingston Parish Court in April, 2014 to pay a $700 fine, a $250 probation fee plus court costs, and had to forfeit six gator hides in relation to the 2013 case. In Ascension Parish in May of 2014, he was fined $100 plus court costs and had to forfeit two alligator hides, Einck said. Additionally, because of the 2013 violations, he was removed from LDWF's Nuisance Alligator Program. 

Not abiding by alligator hunting regulations, taking alligators from unapproved areas, possession of illegally taken alligators and improperly  tagging alligators each bring a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense. Not abiding by WMA regulations brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail. In Ascension Parish in May of 2014, he was fined $100 plus court costs and had to forfeit two alligator hides, Einck said, 

Criminal trespass carries up to a $1,000 fine and up to 30 days in jail.  Obstruction of justice brings up to a $10,000 fine and five years in prison, according to the release.