June 2018 - Volume 38, Number 6

Features

Late afternoon trout trips typically offer calmer winds, fewer boats, cooler temperatures — and plenty of specks. Here’s how one no-frills Fourchon angler avoids the crowd and still fills up his box.

Although he still gets up some mornings at 3 a.m. to participate in the rat race to go catch fish, Kevin Lawson admittedly isn’t as mad at speckled trout as he used to be.

Contrary to popular belief, there is life after the spawn for Louisiana’s crappie anglers. Here’s how the reigning state champ gets it done all summer long.

“The fish have it backwards when it comes to the weather,” Nick Young said as he cruised his big Ranger down the edge of the boat channel, scanning his electronics for suspended crappie.

It’s not too late this month to target trout on the famed train bridge in Lake Pontchartrain. Find out why one guide believes the drop-shot rig is key to catching.

The legendary Trestles train bridge on Lake Pontchartrain is loaded with fish — and fishermen — every spring.  When the speckled trout bite is super hot and winds are calm, the 5-mile-long bridge often has a boat on almost every piling.

If you have the latest electronics onboard, you can forget Toledo Bend’s over-fished brush piles — and still find plenty of unpressured crappie.

Jerry “J.T.” Thompson stared intently at the screen of his 12-inch down-scan unit as he brought the pontoon boat off plane.

Two False River anglers load up on nice catfish every summer —without so much as a rod, or even a single hook. Read on to bone up on bottle fishing.

Catfishing is supposed to be all about a gob of slimy worms, or bloody chicken liver, or smelly cut bait — or better yet some concoction of secret ingredients, usually including spoiled sour cheese.

Identifying the types and sizes of pockets bass are inhabiting right now is a big key to catching fish. Here’s how a couple of Elite Series pros break it down.

Think of a scavenger hunt: You’re trying to locate a specific objective and the task requires a lot of looking. Random scrambling wastes too much time, so you try to mentally break down the search by likely parameters — where would the hunted items likely exist?

Topwaters, suspending baits and soft plastics can all be effective ways to reel in speckled trout — but the key is knowing when to use them. Two veteran Big Lake guides share their expertise so you’ll know which trick to pick.

Ugh!

I sure was happy when Jeff Poe pointed his boat’s pointy nose north out of Hebert’s Landing on Calcasieu Lake. In the early light, the sky to the south looked like a bruised eggpant — purple and ugly. 

Avid surf fisherman Sammy Romano shows off a beautiful speckled trout caught on Curlew Island in the Chandeleur chain. For more surf-fishing tips from Romano, go to page 140.