Volume 35 Number 3 - March 2015

Features

Yeah, the Mississippi River is high and roiling with mud during the spring thaw, but that doesn’t mean you can’t load up on speckled trout where it empties into the Gulf. Here’s how the pros do it.

Rule No. 1 for speckled trout fishing: Look for clean water. 

As far as Louisiana speck fisherman go, that’s probably rule Nos. 2 and 3, as well. Their definition of “clean water” is clear water— that kind of green, fishy clear that makes their pulses run hard.

There is some dispute as to whether Mark Twain called the Missouri River or the Mississippi River “too thick to drink and too thin to plow.”

Cold fronts and blustery winds can make fishing a challenge this month, but redfish are prowling the shallows looking for baitfish. Here’s how this Myrtle Grove guide uses a surface-drive boat to catch them.

I shivered involuntarily in the predawn light. It felt more like I was going duck hunting than fishing, especially since I was in a surface drive-driven shallow-water boat.

Chicot Lake has produced some huge bass, but last year the slot limit was finally dropped. That means the limit is now 10 fish of any size — and there are plenty to be caught. Here’s how to up your fishing odds.

It’s not often when you get Chicot Lake mostly to yourself. But Turkey Creek’s Mike Barzare and I found an afternoon last spring when we encountered only a few boats on the Evangeline Parish fishery.

The bass spawn is fast approaching, but unpredictable spring weather can make consistently limits difficult. Here’s how the pros overcome the challenge.

There’s a fine line between prespawn and spawning movement — get it wrong and you’ll be wasting time by fishing ahead of or behind the fish.

If you need something to add to your next get-together, a quick fishing trip to Bayou Lacombe can provide enough meat for some delicious fried-fish sandwiches.

You know how it goes: After slurping through a few pounds of spicy boiled crawfish you start craving a something a little heavier and crunchier.

Today’s aluminum boats ain’t your grandpa’s john boat. Instead, there are a multitude of choices that fit every hunting and fishing need.

Traditionally, many have thought of aluminum boats as being somehow utilitarian and, well, basic. But that’s changed over that past decade or so, and now aluminum boats are built for every purpose imaginable — from carrying duck hunters into the swamp to screaming-fast bass boats to tricked out bay boats.

During the transition to the spawn, there are still plenty crappie in deep channels. And this Duck Commander crew member has developed a rig that loads the boat.

“That’s not a fair question,” Jay Stone said, turning his head quickly to eyeball the tip of one of the 16-foot crappie poles that he thought had signaled another fish on the end of the line.

Bayou Dularge is famous for its redfish and trout, but there also are plenty of little green fish in the area this month. Here’s how to add bass to your box — but don’t wait because the bite is only a few weeks long.

As I’ve grown from a wild-eyed 13-year-old wondering what kind of hovercraft I would be driving in the year 2000 to a 45-year-old wondering where the time went, I’ve learned to appreciate the little things in life.

Find grass and you’ll find prespawn sweet spots that hold big bass waiting to move up. Here are some pro thoughts on how to leverage that information.

Grass equals bass — yep, we got that. But getting to know the specific makeup of vegetation is essential, especially during the early spring before the it grows tall and thick. 

As winter finally breaks, it's time to get on the water for some of the best bass fishing of the year, but don't forget that reds and crappie are also on the prowl.