Volume 34 Number 4 - April 2014

Features

Toledo Bend has already been pumping out 10-pounders this year, but there’s no better time to catch lunker bass than this month.

Half-ounce Rat-L-Traps were about as rare from Alexandria west to Toledo Bend last month as a Republican at an Obama rally.

The bitter cold that gripped the state the past few months is actually good news for Toledo Bend anglers looking to catch bedding bass. Here’s why.

If there has ever been a colder winter at Toledo Bend, Bassmaster Elite Series pro Dennis Tietje cannot remember it.

When a live shrimp finds itself in the wrong part of the Biloxi Marsh, things can get violent. And anglers can use that knowledge to put a lot of fish in their boats this month.

Whenever I fish with Capt. Mike Gallo, we always bring a third man along. There’s plenty of room in his 24-foot bay boat, plus it means an extra set of hands and a third line in the water to increase our chances of catching something picture worthy.

Glare from sunlight bouncing off the water can be an angler’s worst nightmare ­— especially when sight fishing. Here are some ways to manage that problem.

Seeing is believing, but you’d better believe that too much of a good thing — namely, sunlight — can make it tough for you to see what you’re seeking.

April is one of those transition months that can be tough to fish ­— so you have to have plenty of options. Here’s how to score in Port Sulphur and Empire.

“Redfish in April?” Artie laughed as Doc mentioned our forthcoming fishing trip. “Man, redfish ain’t ‘runnin now! Dey run in da fall! You guys gotta be outcha mind!

Looking for a different way to put some fish on the bank? These veteran snaggers share the secrets to their successes.

There are about as many ways to catch catfish as there are ways to cook them. Rods, yo-yos, jugs, trotlines, nets, traps and limb lines are all employed by Louisiana sportsmen.

Capt. Steve Shook has been known for decades for catching huge trout, and he’s now sharing the secrets to his success.

Speckled trout have always been the premier gamefish in Louisiana’s coastal marshes, and big speckled trout — the kind that are 7 pounds and larger — are the stuff of which dreams are made.

Calcasieu Lake and its cousin Sabine Lake are known for producing lunker trout, and there’s no better way to target these trophy fish than to abandon your boat. Here are some keys.

You won’t find too many speckled trout anglers who like wind. Wind muddies the water. Wind makes even simple things more difficult.

Keeping young turkey hunters interested in the sport is all about action, and sometimes getting a turkey close enough for a shot requires some extra effort. Here’s how one youngster bagged his first gobbler.

Twelve-year-old Dane Humbles tightened his grip on the shotgun and sighted down the barrel as the big gobbler closed the distance in a quick trot.