June 2010 - Volume 30, Number 6

Features

You’ll be tempted to start doing your favorite disco dance when you see how fast the after-dark speck action is this month south of DuLarge.

Now I know what driving against contra-flow must feel like. The boats that were getting out of Bayou DuLarge down at Jug’s were making it difficult for us to get in. However, had it not been for the brutal heat that has gripped Louisiana this summer, we might have been among the ones leaving rather than launching.

The Red River is like an entirely different waterway than it was just two years ago. Here’s how to catch bass there this summer.

As a guide on the Red River, Russ McVey gets frequent calls requesting topographical maps of his home water. Folks can hardly believe it when he tells them there isn’t one, and some go on to question his sanity.

Now that the grass is coming back, bream action is picking up big-time in this overlooked lake.

To the east, an orange ball glowed just above the horizon through the cypress and tupelo trees in the backwater areas of the basin. As expected, a light steamy mist — not even close to being a fog — gently kissed the water of Flat Lake as we crossed it heading north.

Divide Lafitte up into four sections, and you’ll load the boat this summer no matter what the wind is doing.

It’s a long way from the icy lakes of Mankato, Minn., to the tepid swamps of Southeast Louisiana.

This road between LaPlace and Manchac is like a giant fishing pier providing access to fantastic small-boat action.

Doc Fontaine’s brother-in-law of the month was visiting South Louisiana from Oregon for a wedding. He also wanted to squeeze in some of the fabulous fishing Doc had been preaching about since they’d met a year earlier.

This sport is growing rapidly because it is so much fun and surprisingly productive.

I had been warned that kayak fishermen are passionate about their sport, and that they love to talk about it. Oh, how they love to talk about it!

Do you enjoy working for your meals? Neither do trophy speckled trout. Use that to your advantage this month to put real wall-hangers in the boat.

If husbands could achieve trophy status by the number of their weight on the scales rather than the number of dimples on their chins, I would grade out much higher today than I did 14 years ago when my wife and I got married.

Use these techniques to have monster mangroves eating out of your hand.

The athletic young man’s glittering eyes and neatly trimmed goatee gave him the look of a predator. He was standing next to the boat that he had just won for catching the biggest mangrove snapper in the 2009 Coastal Conservation Association STAR Tournament.

Grand Isle’s neighbor to the east has everything a June angler could possibly want.

Capt. Eddie Berthelot and I idled into the Wildlife and Fisheries Canal on the north side of Grand Terre Island in late April with prior knowledge and past years’ experiences pointing out that we were about to have a good time.

The oil spill is keeping things touch-and-go, but there are plenty of alternatives for anglers who want to put fish in the boat.