Volume 29 Number 1 - January 2009

Features

If you hunt the extreme eastern section of Area 1, now’s the time to be on your stand.

It’s no big secret that our collective attention spans are growing shorter. While the Internet is largely responsible for us not being able to digest information unless it is written in brief bullets, some say USA Today is what started this trend.

Tactics need to change for hunters to be successful with wary late-season ducks.

The rhythmic whistle of mallard wings slicing bits of air from the sky could be heard as they nervously circled high above. Too high. They weren’t completely sold on what they were seeing below, but they were willing to make another pass to take a closer look.

Both anchoring and trolling are undoubtedly productive methods of trout fishing in Southeast Louisiana. However, wintertime anglers who learn to drift will find that this method puts fish in the boat when nothing else will.

Wintertime trout fishing requires slow presentation and feeling for that ever-so-slight bite. Drifting allows you to cover a lot of ground and locate where the fish are holding.

A wedge of water will pour into Venice from more northern climes. Either it will defeat you as an angler, or you’ll use it to your advantage.

Whoever is in charge of fishing at Venice this year must be the same guy who schedules the holidays.

How many times have you seen a buck lurking in the thickets, but been unable to get a shot? Here’s a great way to pull those wary animals out of the brush.

Brad Pourciau had caught glimpses of a buck from a pipeline stand, but never could get a clear shot. The Baton Rouge hunter was lamenting that fact back at the camp, and one of his buddies told him there was a sure-fire way of bagging that deer.

Deer numbers are getting too high on these productive WMAs, and the LDWF wants your assistance to thin them out.

“Help Wanted” signs are sure to be scarce in the near future if economic forecasts prove true.

Specks and reds make the Sulfur Mine an annual winter favorite.

The weather forecast predicted cold temperatures and winds blowing out of the north at up to 25 mph. It would be perfect weather for duck hunting. Only we weren’t going duck hunting, we were going fishing.

An increase in allowable weapons makes the late-season Primitive Firearms Season too good to pass up.

If you failed to tag a deer during the regular gun season or if you need a deer or two for sausage, don’t fret. There is still opportunity during the late Primitive Firearms Season.

It’s now or never for duck hunters who just can’t get enough of the thrill of committed birds diving into a meticulously set out spread.

If only Pelayo were as punctual as wood ducks. The exasperating two-winged creatures keep a rigid daily schedule, flying exactly five minutes before and five minutes after legal shooting time.

Brad Pourciau has had great success using decoys to lure in late-season bucks.